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Hassop village in the Derbyshire Peak District

Situated on the road from Bakewell to Calver, Hassop was developed around a number of lead mines.

In the 13th century, Hassop in Derbyshire came into the hands of the Foljambe family who held much of the land in the area, later passing to the Eyre family who built the first seat on the magnificent south slope on which the present successor now stands. It was radically enlarged or replaced with a new house in the early 17th century.

During the English Civil War the house was garrisoned for the king by Col William Eyre. who had to compound for his estate for the colossal sum of 21,000 although so extensive and lead rich was it that the sum was easily raised and the estate remained with his posterity.

Between 1827 and 1833 Thomas Eyre, seventh earl of Newburgh modernized the house incorporating the earlier version. He moved the entrance from the south to the west and classicized both facades. The main south front is stone, of 3 storeys, with a top balustrade and four full height canted bays, the centre only slightly empasized by an elaborate doorcase with a pedimented window over. The architect of these improvements is unknown. The interiors are early 19c with chimney pieces by White Watson of Ashford in the Water. In the dining room there is heraldic glass from Warkworth Castle, Northamptonshire. The Hall is now an elegant Hotel and popular wedding venue.

All Saints RC church in Hassop Derbyshire was built between 1816-1818 by the Roman Catholic architect Joseph Ireland as a private chapel for the Eyre family of Hassop Hall. This is an exquisite Classical Revival temple with an impressive pillared portico in the Etruscan style and a barrel vaulted interior with a coved coffered ceiling. The ornate altar and reredos is said to be of French origin. In the back gallery is a gem of a chamber organ by H C Lincoln dating from the 1820's and recently restored. Contains a painting of the crucifixation with the Virgin and St John and a monument to Thomas Eyre who died in 1833.

Formally a farmstead and 17th Century Coaching Inn, The Eyre Arms is now a Family owned and run pub restaurant

Hassop railway station has been converted to a bookshop, cafe and the online operation of Countrybookshop, who also organise the Peak Literary Festival. The trackbed through the station is now part of the Monsal Trail.

Hassop Hall
Hassop Hall
 All Saints RC church
All Saints RC church
 Eyre Arms at Hassop
Eyre Arms at Hassop


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